Megadeth’s Dave Mustaine Diagnosed With Cancer

Megadeth frontman Dave Mustaine shared the sad news with fans that he has been diagnosed with throat cancer and the band has been forced to cancel most of their live dates for the year as he seeks treatment.

Dave Mustaine Show em Curitiba | Photo Credit: Jhonesilverio
Dave Mustaine Show em Curitiba | Photo Credit: Jhonesilverio

Mustaine broke the news to fans on Instagram with the following message,

“I’ve been diagnosed with throat cancer. It’s clearly something to be respected and faced head on – but I’ve faced obstacles before. I’m working closely with my doctors, and we’ve mapped out a treatment plan which they feel has a 90% success rate. Treatment has already begun.

“Unfortunately, this requires that we cancel most shows this year. The 2019 Megacruise will happen, and the band will be a part of it in some form. All up to date information will be at megadeth.com as we get it. Megadeth will be back on the road ASAP.

“Meanwhile, Kiko, David, Dirk and I are in the studio, working on the follow up to Dystopia – which I can’t wait for everyone to hear.I’m so thankful for my whole team – family, doctors, band members, trainers, and more.

“I’ll keep everyone posted.”

Dave Mustaine

Slash (GNR) Sees A New Wave For Rock Coming

Guns N’ Roses lead guitarist Slash says that he sees a “wave coming” of a new generation of authentic rock bands who will be doing it for the “right reasons”.

Slash (GNR) Sees A New Wave For Rock Coming

While bands like GNR are attacking stadium sized crowds, there have been very few new rock bands emerge and find success over the past decade, with the exception of groups like Rival Sons and Greta Van Fleet, who are bringing the classic guitar rock style to younger fans.

Slash, while doing an interview with Guitar Interactive to promote the latest record, Living The Dream”, and tour for his band Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy And The Conspirators, was asked what he thought of Greta Van Fleet.

“Everybody keeps asking me. I don’t, really… I can’t say that I listen to ’em, but I love the fact that they’re sort of coming from a pure place. I have to admit the stuff I heard does sound very reminiscent of Zeppelin, and I’ve heard some stories about how they were raised on that. And it’s all good.

“When they put out their next record, we’ll see if they can branch away from that and become their own band. But at the same time, the fact that they’re having success is opening up doors for a lot of other kids.”

Slash says that he sees “a wave coming. There’s not really much else I can say, because I do my thing, and I’m sort of watching peripherally what’s happening, what everybody else is doing.

“I have to admit, most of the bands that are putting out records that I listen to are bands that I’ve known for a long time, Alice In Chains’ new record, Queens Of The Stone Age and Foo Fighters, whatever.

“But there’s a thing happening, bubbling under the surface with kids right now that are going in rock and roll for what I would call all the right reasons, as opposed to trying to be celebrities before they can put together five chords. It seems like there’s a real attitude and a real hunger to do something that’s got some balls.”

Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger ‘Feeling Pretty Good’ After Heart Surgery

Mick Jagger during a Rolling Stones concert in Zuiderpark in The Hague | Photo Credit: Bert Verhoeff

Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger updated fans on his health following heart surgery and his thoughts on the band’s upcoming No Filter tour in a new interview with Q107 Toronto.

“I’m feeling pretty good,”

Mick Jagger

Jagger tells morning host John Derringer.

“Been rehearsing a lot lately in the last few weeks … This morning [I did] a bit of gym. Nothing crazy. Then I go into rehearsal with the rest of the band.”

The rocker – who continues to recover from surgery in early April to replace a valve in his heart – revealed the group have been preparing some songs they “haven’t done recently” and others they “haven’t done before.”

“We try and get a bit into the unusual,”

said Jagger, revealing that 1976’s “Memory Motel” was one of the songs the band had been rehearsing.

“We actually rehearsed that one the other day.

“Most of the time, people don’t want too much of the unusual,” he joked. “The favorite ones people like to hear are, you know, ‘Paint it Black’, ‘Honky Tonk [Women]’ and ‘Satisfaction’ and things like that. We don’t always necessarily do all of them. We sometimes drop one or two, but there’s maybe ten favorites. I don’t know how people would feel if you didn’t do any of them. I think people would say, ‘Oh, that’s a bit unfortunate, I came to hear this.'”

The 75-year-old singer says he still enjoys being out on the road.

“I don’t do it all the time, [like] 12 months a year,” he adds. “When you’re young, that’s what you do. [Today I] spend three or four months on the road in a year and that seems to be quite a good balance.”

(hennemusic)

Video: Journey’s Neal Schon Tributes Prince With ‘Purple Rain’ Cover

Journey guitarist Neal Schon both celebrated Prince’s birthday last week, as well as gave fans a taste of his forthcoming solo album with the release of his cover of the classic “Purple Rain”.

Schon will be releasing the album, entitled “Universe”, this fall. Check out his cover of “Purple Rain” here. In the post, Neal shared a memory from Rick Barron, who wrote “Prince, pancakes, and Journey guitar riffs at 4 am… late eighties and I am sitting with Prince on the floor in his apartment at Paisley Park.

“We’ve listened to Joni Mitchell, Peter Gabriel and I notice a worn Journey Escape record in his collection. Surprised I turned to him and said ‘Never took you for a Journey fan’.

“He gave me that doeeyed look that always made me uncomfortable and said: ‘Neal Schon is one of my favorite guitarists on the planet, he is a genius.'”

Neal’s connection to the song actually goes deeper, with him and Journey keyboardist revealing during a 2016 interview that Prince asked for their blessing before releasing the song.

Cain told Billboard that Prince told him, “‘I want to play something for you, and I want you to check it out. The chord changes are close to ‘Faithfully’, and I don’t want you to sue me.'” He then shared his response, “I thought it was an amazing tune, and I told him, ‘Man, I’m just super-flattered that you even called. It shows you’re that classy of a guy. Good luck with the song. I know it’s gonna be a hit.’ And it was ‘Purple Rain’.”

Schon added, “Prince felt, I guess, it was obvious enough that he was worried we were going to sue him. I think he called our office asking about it and we all talked about it and everybody said, ‘Nah, it’s the highest form of flattery. Let it go.'”

Woodstock 50 Takes Another Hit: The Venue and the Event Producer Have Backed Out

Woodstock 50 has been circling the drain for months, and its organizers have refused to give up . . . but this may be the final nail in the coffin:

Yesterday, Watkins Glen International officially backed out as the venue, leaving Woodstock without a home . . . with just TWO MONTHS to go before it’s supposed to happen.

Watkins Glen said, quote, “[We’ve] terminated the site license for Woodstock pursuant to provisions of the contract . . . [We] will not be hosting Woodstock 50.”

Also yesterday, the event’s SECOND producer, CID Entertainment, also cut ties.  They were set to provide enhanced camping, travel packages, and transportation.

And yet, the organizers are STILL refusing to pull the plug. 

Last night, they said, quote, “We’re in discussions with another venue to host Woodstock 50 on August 16th to the 18th, and look forward to sharing the new location when tickets go on sale in the coming weeks.”

That’s wildly optimistic . . . and if you’ve seen any of those Fyre Festival documentaries, you know what happens when you stubbornly try to force a music festival into existence at the last minute.

At this point, the organizers may be all that Woodstock 50 has . . . like the Fyre Festival, they HAVE a lineup, but it’s unclear how stable that is, now that they’ve lost their initial financiers, and the venue the artists signed on to perform at.